Kids And Chinese Whispers

I have learned something yesterday. When my daughters tell me a piece of news, I have to expect it to be only 95% accurate. And had I believed it to be 100% true, I’d have made a fool out of myself.

Yesterday Cass told me that her classmate, S’s father had passed away and that her friend had not gone to school for 3 days. I was flabbergasted as I know S’s dad. We had met in a few of the class parties and birthday parties. He was about my age. I could not believe that he had such a short life. I was thinking about his death the whole afternoon.  I wanted to send a Whatsapp message to the class teacher to ask if the girl was OK, how she’s coping with her dad’s passing and how the father died.  But I was worried that Cass’ class teacher would think that I am a KPC, so I Whatsapped D’s mother whom I have made friends with since last year to ask if she knew of the unexpected death.

Thank God I Whatsapped D’s mother instead of the class teacher.  D’s mother later found out from D that it is NOT S’s father who had passed away but her grand father instead!  Had I Whatsapped the class teacher to ask, I would have made myself look like a ludicrous KPC! 😅

Moral of the story is this ~ never trust a kid’s words 100%.  What they hear from their teachers and friends can sometimes be like a Chinese Whispers (or Telephone) game. They hear something else and tell other people a distorted story.

Also keep your secrets from an under-10 kid.  She may promise you, cross her heart and swear to die if  she lets out the secret; and the next thing you know, she had let the cat out of the bag to your relative or friend by a slip of her tongue!

Pix below were taken at Cass’ school yesterday. There was a Parents Appreciation Day in school and for the first time ever, the school organized an event where the students had to publicly declare their love and appreciation to their parents with such filial piety acts as giving their parents’ a shoulder massage, feet wash, feet massage, hugs and words of love and appreciation.

In Confucian philosophy, filial piety (Chinese: xiào) is a virtue of respect for one’s parents, elders, and ancestors.  It is a norm for Chinese schools  to teach  filial piety.

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