Foods to Avoid for Good Dental Health

Though they are the primary tool used in eating, your teeth can be damaged by the foods you eat. Tooth decay or gum disease can lead to changes in your teeth alignment, requiring the services of a Queen Creek orthodontics office in order to chew and swallow without discomfort. Cavities can be caused by poor oral hygiene and a diet filled with foods that are high in sugar or contain ingredients that erode the enamel from your teeth. If you want to focus on oral health, here is a list of some foods and drinks that you should avoid.

Sour Coated Candies

Candies, because of their high sugar content, are bad for your teeth, but sour candies are the worst. There are several different acids in candies that have a more damaging effect on the teeth. They are also a lot harder to chew, leaving the coating from the candies on your teeth for longer periods of time. Snack of a square of dark chocolate if you are in the mood for something sweet.

Alcohol

It has long been recommended that you avoid high consumption of alcohol for heart and liver concerns, but alcohol also has an impact on your oral health. Your mouth becomes extremely dry when you drink liquor or alcohol, removing the saliva that helps naturally keep your teeth clean. Saliva is instrumental in preventing oral infections, gum disease, and tooth decay.

Bread

Many who are struggle with their weight have been told to give up carbs, with white bread being one of the more well-known culprits of delivering too many carbs. However, bread is also damaging to the teeth when saliva breaks down the starch and convert it into sugar. The pasty conversion sticks to all the cracks and crevices of the mouth, increasing the risk for cavities. If you can make the switch to whole grain bread, you will do your teeth a favor.

Carbonated Drinks

Ranking as terrible as candy is the category of carbonated drinks. It doesn’t matter if you choose a diet soda or prefer a caffeine-free, the effects of carbonated drinks on your teeth have considered as damaging as using crack cocaine or methamphetamine. Plaque forms more easily and acid from the beverage attacks your tooth enamel and increases the risk of tooth decay. Sodas can also be very drying, repeating the saliva problem found in alcohol.

You can prevent cavities and a buildup of plaque from causing pain and sensitivity by choosing your foods carefully. Put these items at the top of the list of foods to avoid.

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